evangelame:

having your favorite character be a minor character is like being a proud mother at a school play and cheering every time your kid comes on stage even though they’re playin the part of tree #3

spaceyiffs:

tonyswirl:

ineffable-hufflepuff:

misandryevans:

babymarkers:

the-chocolate-chip-pancake:

thatsnotwatyourmomsaid:

none pizza with left beef

It should be a rule of Tumblr to always reblog none pizza with left beef

ive missed you

#THIS IS MY FAVORITE FUCKING THING JUST THE BEEF#YOU COULD TELL THE POOR CHEF WAS JUST FUCKING#DISGUSTED#WHAT THE FUCK IS THIS#WHAT THE F U C K IS THIS#WHO THE FUCK ORDERS A#A /NONE/ PIZZA?? JUST BEEF ON THE LEFT???#FUCK IT#F U CK IT#JUST COOK THE FUCKING DOUGH#HERE LET ME THROW THIS FUCKING HANDFUL OF OBLONG BEEF CHUNKS AT YOUR NONE FUCKING PIZZA#FUCK YOU#FUCK YOU AND ALL YOU STAND FOR#LEFT FUCKING BEEF (via askscientistcarlos)

I love None Pizza with Left Beef.

3th time i’ve reblogged this

3th
minunyu:

motivational monomi doing her best to cheer up the sdr2 crew

minunyu:

motivational monomi doing her best to cheer up the sdr2 crew

essayofthoughts:

indigoumbrella:

essayofthoughts:

indigoumbrella:

huffpostarts:

In The Not So Distant Future, Glow-In-The-Dark Trees Could Replace Street Lights

Is that… is that even healthy?

There are sea organisms and fungi which glow in the dark and there’s fireflies and jellyfish which glow in the dark. It doesn’t do them any harm nor does it do the people around them any harm. I would say its pretty healthy, as well as it would mean more photosynthesis happening in cities which mean cleaner air.

I was just curious about how they were doing it and for some reason I didn’t think to click the link. But thanks! It makes more sense now. I was afraid it was some kind of chemical thing.

nah just genetic modification using existing bioluminescent genes. Genetics is really cool, and so is bioluminescence. I mean they’ve already made pigs glow using jellyfish genes and pigs are waaay more complicated than trees iirc. So they’re actually (i think) less likely to muck it up with trees.

In which case

GLOWY

FORESTS

GLOWY

TREES

GLOWY

EVERYTHING

(I like glowy things)

karenhurley:

This campaign is great, really makes you look closer instead of just and quick stereotypical glance 

GSR Entrance Hall System

Advertising Agency: SPR Agency, Novo Hamburgo, Brazil Via

tamorapierce:

In which Natalie Dormer speaks the truth : “Even if the woman is not actually saying no out-loud. You know, I think it’s there. Absence of consent. If the guy isn’t sure, he should find out.

They know.  They just don’t care.

nihon-no-ningyou:

A set of cute chirimen decorations for Otsukimi (the moon-viewing festival). Chirimen crafts are often associated with Kyoto.

nihon-no-ningyou:

A set of cute chirimen decorations for Otsukimi (the moon-viewing festival). Chirimen crafts are often associated with Kyoto.

tamorapierce:

ucresearch:

The King Herself
Egypt’s Pharaoh Hatshepsut had presided over her kingdom’s most peaceful and prosperous period in generations. Yet 25 years after her death, much of the evidence of her success had been erased or reassigned to her male predecessors.
Even after 20th-century archaeologists began to unearth traces of the woman who defied tradition to crown herself as king, Hatshepsut still didn’t get her due, a UCLA Egyptologist argues in a forthcoming book.
“She’s been described as a usurper, and the obliteration of her contributions has been attributed to a backlash against what has been seen as her power-grabbing ways,” said Kara Cooney, the author of The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut’s Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt.
Cooney illuminates the difficult position into which Hatshepsut was born. The lone daughter of one of ancient Egypt’s most successful warrior kings —Thutmose I— she lived in a society in which the crown was passed from father to son and royal children were expected to marry their siblings.
After the deaths of both of her brothers, Hatshepsut married a sickly half-brother, who was crowned Thutmose II when their father died. Despite intense pressure to produce a male heir, she bore just one surviving daughter. So after Thutmose II died (when Hatshepsut was about 16), a baby boy born to a member of his harem was selected to succeed him.
“The risk in a succession crisis of this kind was that a strong man — some kind of warlord with political and military backing — could take over, and the dynasty would switch to another family,” Cooney said. “But Hatshepsut was smart, skilled and strategic enough to support a baby and make sure that baby was educated and prepared to take the throne and continue the success of her dynasty.”
Following a revelation in which Amen picked her to rule, Hatshepsut ended up taking over as regent — and never stepped aside.
Read More: Egyptologist gives new life to female pharaoh →

Hail to the Pharoah, who wore the royal beard to show that she was the master of all Egypt!

tamorapierce:

ucresearch:

The King Herself


Egypt’s Pharaoh Hatshepsut had presided over her kingdom’s most peaceful and prosperous period in generations. Yet 25 years after her death, much of the evidence of her success had been erased or reassigned to her male predecessors.

Even after 20th-century archaeologists began to unearth traces of the woman who defied tradition to crown herself as king, Hatshepsut still didn’t get her due, a UCLA Egyptologist argues in a forthcoming book.

“She’s been described as a usurper, and the obliteration of her contributions has been attributed to a backlash against what has been seen as her power-grabbing ways,” said Kara Cooney, the author of The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut’s Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt.

Cooney illuminates the difficult position into which Hatshepsut was born. The lone daughter of one of ancient Egypt’s most successful warrior kings —Thutmose I— she lived in a society in which the crown was passed from father to son and royal children were expected to marry their siblings.

After the deaths of both of her brothers, Hatshepsut married a sickly half-brother, who was crowned Thutmose II when their father died. Despite intense pressure to produce a male heir, she bore just one surviving daughter. So after Thutmose II died (when Hatshepsut was about 16), a baby boy born to a member of his harem was selected to succeed him.

“The risk in a succession crisis of this kind was that a strong man — some kind of warlord with political and military backing — could take over, and the dynasty would switch to another family,” Cooney said. “But Hatshepsut was smart, skilled and strategic enough to support a baby and make sure that baby was educated and prepared to take the throne and continue the success of her dynasty.”

Following a revelation in which Amen picked her to rule, Hatshepsut ended up taking over as regent — and never stepped aside.

Read More: Egyptologist gives new life to female pharaoh

Hail to the Pharoah, who wore the royal beard to show that she was the master of all Egypt!

crimescenecumstains:

I FUCKING SAW THIS AT TARGET AND ALMOST PISSED MYSELF

crimescenecumstains:

I FUCKING SAW THIS AT TARGET AND ALMOST PISSED MYSELF